Visitor interacting with the MFA Show
Gif of "Work For Progress", includes a loading bar that never completes
project overview
For this project I was the creative lead and art director for the University of Texas at Austin Master of Fine Arts (MFA) Design show, Work For Progress. As part of the MFA degree, candidates are required to display their final thesis in a gallery show. However, the expectation to cram two years of research, iterations, and process, into a neatly packaged display felt disingenuous to the degree and design process. To facilitate this idea we moved our studio into the gallery for the duration of the show. This allowed visitors to ask us questions while they interacted with our research and gained insight into the design process. You can visit our website (an editable google doc) at workforprogress.show or check out our instagram page at instagram.com/workforprogress.show​​​​​​​
Created while at UT Austin, 2019. Some photos courtesy of Sandy Carson and Lawrence Peart
"Work For Progress" changeable sign
"Work For Progress" changeable sign
A visitor playing with the sign.
A visitor playing with the sign.
Introductory signage about the studio space gallery.
Introductory signage about the studio space gallery.
Photo of a classmate's section of the exhibition.
Photo of a classmate's section of the exhibition.
A photo of me working at my desk, in my portion of the exhibition.
A photo of me working at my desk, in my portion of the exhibition.
Close up of my biography. I illustrated and painted the portraits.
Close up of my biography. I illustrated and painted the portraits.
Overview of the biography wall.
Overview of the biography wall.
Sign which was viewable from outside, advertising "free cheese!"
Sign which was viewable from outside, advertising "free cheese!"
Wayfinding graphic which led to the "free cheese!"
Wayfinding graphic which led to the "free cheese!"
Visitors eating the cheese
Visitors eating the cheese
Visitor looking at the collection.
project overview
Like all museums, The Franklin Institute is peppered with “interstitial spaces.” Hallways, corners, and lobbies that are high traffic dead zones. My design team collaborated with the curatorial team to create mini pop-up exhibit spaces, showing off artifacts which are often left in storage. In designing this space, I had to keep in mind future interstitial spaces and how they could have a cohesive look, even when the artifacts or topics varied. I also wanted to create a space that could hold its own against the classic drama of the building, but match the vibrancy and energy of its exhibit halls.
Created while at The Franklin Institute, 2016. Photography courtesy of Colin Lenton.
Visitor looking at the collection.
Full view of the clock collection, showing the mural wall, display case, and matching wayfinding signage.
Image of chairs on pedestals, mixed with some for sitting.
PROJECT OVERVIEW
An exhibit I developed with Alyson Beaton about Charles and Ray Eames and the chairs they designed. No labels or content panels were used in the space; context was provided visually, through process photographs, and visitors were invited to sit on and touch the chairs.

Created while at The University of Texas, 2018. Photos courtesy of Sandy Carson
Visitor looking at the wall of posters.
Visitors interacting in the space, looking at the all of posters, and sitting in the exhibition.
Close of up the Eames' chairs, with posters in the background.
An image of the "interactive" wall, displaying different textiles and images of the Charles & Ray Eames working.
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